Hyperthermia Blog

What's New, What's News, What's Happening

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RSNA15 mapThis year the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) will hold its annual meeting in Chicago marking the organization's 100th anniversary.  The RSNA is the world's largest annual medical meeting with attendance estimated at 55,000 people.  The five day event includes two large exhibition halls presenting medical device products and a full schedule of presentations and education.  The program starts Sunday, Nov 29th and runs thru Thursday Dec. 3rd.

Since this is a really big show, I have included a map Link to help you find us. Our booth, #6563, is located in the far end of North Building, Hall B, just past the end of the Philips booth and directly across from North Cafe.

In addition to our booth and sales team, you may be interested in a lecture by Mark Dewhirst, DVM, PhD from Duke University Medical Center. "Lessons Learned from XRT/Hyperthermia | VISIO41-03” will discuss how hyperthermia compliments the ability of radiotherapy to kill cancer cells include a review of the more than a dozen positive phase III cancer trials; and provide new insights on how hyperthermia affects the process of DNA damage repair.

Lessons Learned from XRT/Hyperthermia
    Wednesday 1:55-2:10 PM | VSIO41-03 | S405AB

PARTICIPANTS:
Mark W. Dewhirst, DVM, PhD durham, NC (Presenter)
Stockholder, Celsion Corporation Research Grant, Biomimetix Corporation Research Grant, Johnson & Johnson Consultant, Nevro Corp Consultant, Merck KGaA Consultant, Siva Corporation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
1) Understand the complimentary interactions between hyperthermia and radiotherapy that increase cell killing. 2) Understand importance of measuring temperature during heating and methods for how this is accomplished. 3) Be able to articulate how hyperthermia affects tumor physiology and how these effects influence treatment responses.

ABSTRACT
There are more than a dozen positive phase III trials showing that hyperthermia can increase local tumor control when it is combined with radiotherapy. Such trials include head and neck cancer, cervix cancer, GBM, esophageal cancer and chest wall recurrences of breast cancer. It has been known for more than two decades that hyperthermia augments the cytotoxicity of radiotherapy. Basic tenants underlying this interaction include proof that hyperthermia inhibits DNA damage-repair. Hyperthermia has complimentary cytotoxicity with radiotherapy in different parts of the cell cycle. Further, hyperthermia can increase tumor perfusion, thereby increasing oxygen delivery; lack of oxygen is a source of relative resistance to radiotherapy. In recent years, however, new insights have been made into how these two treatment modalities interact. These insights come from: 1) innovative clinical trials involving functional imaging and genomics and 2) examination of how hyperthermia affects the process of DNA damage repair. These developments point the way toward new methods to further therapeutic gain by taking advantage of cellular responses to these therapies.